CNBC news dataset

News dataset from cnbc

CNBC is the world leader in business news and real-time financial market coverage. Crawl Feeds team extracted more than 430K+ for search and analysis purposes. Last extracted on Feb 8 2023.

News data available till feb 2023

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title url published_at author publisher short_description keywords header_image category raw_description description uniq_id scraped_at
Fed may need time to have clarity on US economy: Rosengren https://www.cnbc.com/2019/03/05/fed-may-need-time-to-have-clarity-on-us-economy-rosengren.html 2019-03-05T12:42:22+0000 CNBC The Federal Reserve may need "several meetings" to get a good read on the U.S. economy, a top monetary policymaker said on Tuesday, a clear signal that the Fed's rate-hike holiday may last for a while. cnbc, Articles, Inflation, Interest Rates, Central banking, U.S. Economy, Economy, Federal Reserve System, US Economy, Central Banks, US: News, Business News, The Fed, source:tagname:Reuters https://image.cnbcfm.com/api/v1/image/100773958-133424020rr.jpg?v=1532564681 Business News <div class="ArticleBody-articleBody" data-analytics="RegularArticle-articleBody-5-2" data-module="ArticleBody" data-test="articleBody-2" id="RegularArticle-ArticleBody-5"><span class="HighlightShare-hidden" style="top:0;left:0"></span><div class="InlineImage-imageEmbed" data-test="InlineImage" id="ArticleBody-InlineImage-100773958"><div class="InlineImage-wrapper"><div class="InlineImage-imagePlaceholder" style="padding-bottom:55.55555555555556%"><div class="lazyload-placeholder" style="height:100%"></div></div><div><div class="InlineImage-imageEmbedCaption">Eric Rosengren</div><div class="InlineImage-imageEmbedCredit">Wendy Maeda | Boston Globe | Getty Images</div></div></div></div><div class="group"><p>The Federal Reserve may need "several meetings" to get a good read on the U.S. economy, a top monetary policymaker said on Tuesday, a clear signal that the Fed's rate-hike holiday may last for a while.</p><p>Eric Rosengren, president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, said earlier concerns that the economy might overheat without higher interest rates now seem "less pressing," with little inflation pressure and sharp market swings at the end of 2018 making investors less ebullient.</p><div class="lazyload-placeholder" style="height:100%"></div><p>At the same time, slower growth in Europe and China and ongoing trade conflict make it hard to have confidence about the U.S. economy staying strong, he said.</p><p>The remarks in a speech on Tuesday represent a stark change in emphasis for Rosengren, who is a voting member on the Fed's policy-setting Federal Open Market Committee this year. As recently as January, he said two rate hikes could still be necessary in 2019 if optimistic economic forecasts came true.</p><p>Fed officials signaled in January that rate hikes were on hold, saying they would be "patient" before making any moves, after raising rates four times in 2018.</p><p>"It may be several meetings of the Federal Open Market Committee before Fed policymakers have a clearer read on whether the risks are becoming reality—and by how much the economy will slow compared to last year," Rosengren said in remarks prepared for a chapter of the National Association of Corporate Directors in Boston. "Patiently watching to see how the economy develops is the appropriate policy for now, and represents prudent management of risks to the forecast."</p><p>The Fed's next policy meeting will be held March 19-20, followed by gatherings in April, June and July.</p><div class="lazyload-placeholder" style="height:100%"></div><p>Asked if a rate hike would be warranted if the economy develops as he expects, Rosengren was noncommital but said there could be circumstances that would require tightening to be "on the table." He added that the Fed's "patient" stance means not giving "a lot of guidance" as to what the Fed is expecting.</p><p>Rosengren, who last year said tight labor markets could spark inflation, on Tuesday said that strong hiring trends are not showing "much risk" of pushing prices higher, possibly because companies have enough profits to eat higher costs.</p><p>He forecasts U.S. economic growth "somewhat" above 2 percent in 2019, with inflation close to the Fed's 2 percent target. Yet bonds and foreign stock prices reflect elevated risk, sending an unclear message about what lies ahead.</p></div><h2 class="ArticleBody-subtitle"><a id="headline0"></a>Watch: Trump lashes out at Fed Chair Powell in CPAC speech</h2><div aria-labelledby="Placeholder-ArticleBody-Video-105772809" role="region"><div class="PlaceHolder-wrapper" data-test="VideoPlaceHolder" data-vilynx-id="7000068080" id="Placeholder-ArticleBody-Video-105772809" role="button" tabindex="0"><div class="InlineVideo-videoEmbed" data-test="InlineVideo" id="InlineVideo-0"><div class="InlineVideo-wrapper"><div class="InlineVideo-inlineThumbnailContainer"><img alt="President Trump lashes out at Fed Chair Powell in CPAC speech" class="InlineVideo-videoThumbnail" src="https://image.cnbcfm.com/api/v1/image/105772813-gettyimages-1128412580.jpg?v=1551700332&amp;w=750&amp;h=422&amp;vtcrop=y"/><span class="InlineVideo-videoButton"></span><span><div class="undefined PlayButton-container" data-test="PlayButton"><div class="PlayButton-featured PlayButton-base" data-type="play"><span class="PlayButton-flyout">watch now</span><span class="icon-play-triangle PlayButton-icon"></span></div></div></span></div><div class="InlineVideo-videoFooter"><div class="InlineVideo-videoDurationContainer"><span class="InlineVideo-videoLabel">VIDEO</span><span class="InlineVideo-videoDurationWithLeading0">4:12</span><span class="InlineVideo-videoDuration InlineVideo-videoLabel">04:12</span></div><div class="InlineVideo-title">President Trump lashes out at Fed Chair Powell in CPAC speech</div><div class="InlineVideo-section"><a href="https://www.cnbc.com/squawk-box-us/">Squawk Box</a></div></div></div></div><div class="PlaceHolder-endCard PlaceHolder-inactive"></div></div></div><div class="group"></div><div class="MobileAdhesion-container" data-module="mps-slot" id="ArticleBody-MobileAdhesion"></div></div> Eric RosengrenWendy Maeda | Boston Globe | Getty ImagesThe Federal Reserve may need "several meetings" to get a good read on the U.S. economy, a top monetary policymaker said on Tuesday, a clear signal that the Fed's rate-hike holiday may last for a while.Eric Rosengren, president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, said earlier concerns that the economy might overheat without higher interest rates now seem "less pressing," with little inflation pressure and sharp market swings at the end of 2018 making investors less ebullient.At the same time, slower growth in Europe and China and ongoing trade conflict make it hard to have confidence about the U.S. economy staying strong, he said.The remarks in a speech on Tuesday represent a stark change in emphasis for Rosengren, who is a voting member on the Fed's policy-setting Federal Open Market Committee this year. As recently as January, he said two rate hikes could still be necessary in 2019 if optimistic economic forecasts came true.Fed officials signaled in January that rate hikes were on hold, saying they would be "patient" before making any moves, after raising rates four times in 2018."It may be several meetings of the Federal Open Market Committee before Fed policymakers have a clearer read on whether the risks are becoming reality—and by how much the economy will slow compared to last year," Rosengren said in remarks prepared for a chapter of the National Association of Corporate Directors in Boston. "Patiently watching to see how the economy develops is the appropriate policy for now, and represents prudent management of risks to the forecast."The Fed's next policy meeting will be held March 19-20, followed by gatherings in April, June and July.Asked if a rate hike would be warranted if the economy develops as he expects, Rosengren was noncommital but said there could be circumstances that would require tightening to be "on the table." He added that the Fed's "patient" stance means not giving "a lot of guidance" as to what the Fed is expecting.Rosengren, who last year said tight labor markets could spark inflation, on Tuesday said that strong hiring trends are not showing "much risk" of pushing prices higher, possibly because companies have enough profits to eat higher costs.He forecasts U.S. economic growth "somewhat" above 2 percent in 2019, with inflation close to the Fed's 2 percent target. Yet bonds and foreign stock prices reflect elevated risk, sending an unclear message about what lies ahead.Watch: Trump lashes out at Fed Chair Powell in CPAC speechwatch nowVIDEO4:1204:12President Trump lashes out at Fed Chair Powell in CPAC speechSquawk Box b2cdda75-8175-50ce-aae8-33efa682210d 02/08/23
See What People Are Saying On Thurs. June 21st https://www.cnbc.com/2007/06/21/see-what-people-are-saying-on-thurs-june-21st.html 2007-06-21T19:24:32+0000 Lee Brodie CNBC See what people are saying about "Fast Money." Send us an e-mail and your comment could be posted right here on The Rapid Recap. cnbc, Articles, CNBC TV, Fast Money, source:tagname:CNBC US Source https://sc.cnbcfm.com/applications/cnbc.com/staticcontent/img/cnbc_logo.gif?v=1524171804&w=720&h=405 CNBC TV <div class="ArticleBody-articleBody" data-analytics="NewsShowArticle-articleBody-6-2" data-module="ArticleBody" data-test="articleBody-2" id="NewsShowArticle-ArticleBody-6"><span class="HighlightShare-hidden" style="top:0;left:0"></span><div class="group"><p><em>What about Potash in the Ag play?</em><em>Love the show.<br/></em><br/><strong>-- Sheila M.</strong></p><p>Hi Sheila - </p><div class="lazyload-placeholder" style="height:100%"></div><div class="ExclusiveContentBucket-exclusiveContentBucket"><span class="ExclusiveContentBucket-smallSpan"></span><span class="ExclusiveContentBucket-border"></span><h2 class="ExclusiveContentBucket-exclusiveContentHeading">related investing news</h2><div class="ExclusiveContentBucket-contentContainer"><div class="BucketItem-bucketItem" id="News Show Article-ExclusiveContentBucket-1-0"><div class="BucketItem-bucketImageContainer"><img alt="Wall Street rewards Linde for a quarter that exemplifies why we own the stock" class="BucketItem-bucketImage BucketItem-investingClubItem" src="https://image.cnbcfm.com/api/v1/image/104135306-RTSNOE8.jpg?v=1675801067"/><div class="BucketItem-proPillContainer"></div><div class="BucketItem-investingClubPillContainer"><a class="InvestingClubPill-investingClubPillLink" data-type="investing-club-button" href="/investingclub/"><img alt="CNBC Investing Club" class="BucketItem-investingClubPill InvestingClubPill-investingClubPill" src="https://static-redesign.cnbcfm.com/dist/b0b683565c27c5457864.svg"/></a></div></div><div class="BucketItem-textContainer BucketItem-icTextContainer"><div class="BucketItem-title"><a href="https://www.cnbc.com/2023/02/07/wall-street-rewards-linde-for-a-quarter-that-exemplifies-why-we-own-the-stock.html">Wall Street rewards Linde for a quarter that exemplifies why we own the stock</a></div><div class="BucketItem-bylineContainer"><div><div class="BucketItemByline-author"><a href="https://www.cnbc.com/zev-fima/">Zev Fima</a></div></div><div class="BucketItem-publishTime">11 hours ago</div></div></div></div></div></div><p>Although the guys often talk about many different companies in the agriculture space - Eric Bolling's "Ag Play" is only made up of 4 stocks. They are <strong>Agrium (AGU) Bunge (BG), Deere (DE) and Monsanto (MON). </strong>Here's a link if you'd like to read more.<br/><br/><a href="https://www.cnbc.com/2007/05/15/update-fast-money-ag-play.html">&gt; The Fast Money Ag Play</a></p><p><strong>-- Lee Brodie</strong></p><p>----------------------------------------------------------------</p><p><em>Farmers making big profits? Are you guys nuts?! Higher commodity prices, yes. More net profit, no way. Increased costs of FERTILIZER, along with increased expense for fuel, chemicals, water, seed, interest, and EQUIPMENT means that everyone EXCEPT the farmer will be making more money this year.</em></p><p><strong>-- David B. from Missouri</strong></p><div class="lazyload-placeholder" style="height:100%"></div><p>Hi David - </p><p>Thanks for the note. Many different opinions make up the conversation - including yours!</p><p><strong>-- Lee Brodie</strong></p><p><br/>______________________________________________________<br/>Got something to say? Send us an e-mail at <a class="webresource" href="mailto:fastmoney-web@cnbc.com" target="_blank">fastmoney-web@cnbc.com</a> and your comment might be posted on the <em>Rapid Recap</em>! Prefer to keep it between us? You can still send questions and comments to <!-- -->.</p></div><div class="MobileAdhesion-container" data-module="mps-slot" id="ArticleBody-MobileAdhesion"></div></div> What about Potash in the Ag play?Love the show.-- Sheila M.Hi Sheila - related investing newsWall Street rewards Linde for a quarter that exemplifies why we own the stockZev Fima11 hours agoAlthough the guys often talk about many different companies in the agriculture space - Eric Bolling's "Ag Play" is only made up of 4 stocks. They are Agrium (AGU) Bunge (BG), Deere (DE) and Monsanto (MON). Here's a link if you'd like to read more.> The Fast Money Ag Play-- Lee Brodie----------------------------------------------------------------Farmers making big profits? Are you guys nuts?! Higher commodity prices, yes. More net profit, no way. Increased costs of FERTILIZER, along with increased expense for fuel, chemicals, water, seed, interest, and EQUIPMENT means that everyone EXCEPT the farmer will be making more money this year.-- David B. from MissouriHi David - Thanks for the note. Many different opinions make up the conversation - including yours!-- Lee Brodie______________________________________________________Got something to say? Send us an e-mail at fastmoney-web@cnbc.com and your comment might be posted on the Rapid Recap! Prefer to keep it between us? You can still send questions and comments to . 42753344-42e3-5cf4-a5d0-fde7235fb5c0 02/08/23
Lightning Round: Lions Gate, Arena Pharma & More https://www.cnbc.com/2013/06/27/lightning-round-lions-gate-arena-pharma-more.html 2013-06-27T22:52:50+0000 Lee Brodie CNBC Are you ready skeedaddy???!!! It’s time for the Lightning Round. Cramer makes the call on viewer favorites. cnbc, Articles, Lions Gate Entertainment Corp, Scorpio Tankers Inc, Arena Pharmaceuticals Inc, Aircastle Ltd, Becton Dickinson and Co, Calumet Specialty Products Partners LP, Sandisk LLC, Lightning Round, CNBC TV, Mad Money, source:tagname:CNBC US Source https://image.cnbcfm.com/api/v1/image/100509024-lightning-vegas2-getty.jpg?v=1364915229 CNBC TV <div class="ArticleBody-articleBody" data-analytics="NewsShowArticle-articleBody-6-2" data-module="ArticleBody" data-test="articleBody-2" id="NewsShowArticle-ArticleBody-6"><span class="HighlightShare-hidden" style="top:0;left:0"></span><div class="lazyload-placeholder" style="height:400px"></div><div aria-labelledby="Placeholder-ArticleBody-Video-100850952" role="region"><div class="PlaceHolder-wrapper" data-test="VideoPlaceHolder" data-vilynx-id="3000178948" id="Placeholder-ArticleBody-Video-100850952" role="button" tabindex="0"><div class="InlineVideo-videoEmbed" data-test="InlineVideo" id="InlineVideo-0"><div class="InlineVideo-wrapper"><div class="InlineVideo-inlineThumbnailContainer"><img alt="Lightning Round" class="InlineVideo-videoThumbnail" src="https://image.cnbcfm.com/api/v1/image/100850953-c99bd5a8e8c6cb8add4c69efc24771f9ce72e255.jpg?v=1529462588&amp;w=750&amp;h=422&amp;vtcrop=y"/><span class="InlineVideo-videoButton"></span><span><div class="undefined PlayButton-container" data-test="PlayButton"><div class="PlayButton-featured PlayButton-base" data-type="play"><span class="PlayButton-flyout">watch now</span><span class="icon-play-triangle PlayButton-icon"></span></div></div></span></div><div class="InlineVideo-videoFooter"><div class="InlineVideo-videoDurationContainer"><span class="InlineVideo-videoLabel">VIDEO</span><span class="InlineVideo-videoDurationWithLeading0">4:03</span><span class="InlineVideo-videoDuration InlineVideo-videoLabel">04:03</span></div><div class="InlineVideo-title">Lightning Round</div><div class="InlineVideo-section"><a href="https://www.cnbc.com/mad-money/">Mad Money with Jim Cramer</a></div></div></div></div><div class="PlaceHolder-endCard PlaceHolder-inactive"></div></div></div><div class="group"><p> Are you ready skeedaddy???!!! It's time for the Lightning Round. Cramer makes the call on viewer favorites.</p><p><span class="QuoteInBody-quoteNameContainer" data-test="QuoteInBody" id="NewsShowArticle-QuoteInBody-1"><a href="/quotes/LGF.A/">Lions Gate (LGF)</a><span class="QuoteInBody-inlineButton"><span class="AddToWatchlistButton-watchlistContainer" data-analytics-id="-WatchlistDropdown" id="-WatchlistDropdown"><button class="AddToWatchlistButton-watchlistButton"><span class="AddToWatchlistButton-addWatchListFromTag"></span></button></span></span></span>: This entertainment company has a great pipeline, said Cramer. I'm a buyer.</p><div class="lazyload-placeholder" style="height:100%"></div><p><span class="QuoteInBody-quoteNameContainer" data-test="QuoteInBody" id="NewsShowArticle-QuoteInBody-2"><a href="/quotes/A/">Scorpio Tankers (STNG)</a><span class="QuoteInBody-inlineButton"><span class="AddToWatchlistButton-watchlistContainer" data-analytics-id="-WatchlistDropdown" id="-WatchlistDropdown"><button class="AddToWatchlistButton-watchlistButton"><span class="AddToWatchlistButton-addWatchListFromTag"></span></button></span></span></span>: I'm a fan of this entire group, said Cramer. </p></div><div class="InlineImage-imageEmbed" data-test="InlineImage" id="ArticleBody-InlineImage-100509058"><div class="InlineImage-wrapper"><div class="InlineImage-imagePlaceholder" style="padding-bottom:55.55555555555556%"><div class="lazyload-placeholder" style="height:100%"></div></div><div><div class="InlineImage-imageEmbedCaption"></div><div class="InlineImage-imageEmbedCredit">username | Wikipedia</div></div></div></div><div class="group"><p><span class="QuoteInBody-quoteNameContainer" data-test="QuoteInBody" id="NewsShowArticle-QuoteInBody-3"><a href="/quotes/ARNA/"> Arena Pharmaceuticals (ARNA)</a><span class="QuoteInBody-inlineButton"><span class="AddToWatchlistButton-watchlistContainer" data-analytics-id="-WatchlistDropdown" id="-WatchlistDropdown"><button class="AddToWatchlistButton-watchlistButton"><span class="AddToWatchlistButton-addWatchListFromTag"></span></button></span></span></span>: It's not a buy for me, said Cramer. I think there are better places to make money.</p><p><span class="QuoteInBody-quoteNameContainer" data-test="QuoteInBody" id="NewsShowArticle-QuoteInBody-4"><a href="/quotes/BDX/">Becton, Dickinson &amp; Co (BDX)</a><span class="QuoteInBody-inlineButton"><span class="AddToWatchlistButton-watchlistContainer" data-analytics-id="-WatchlistDropdown" id="-WatchlistDropdown"><button class="AddToWatchlistButton-watchlistButton"><span class="AddToWatchlistButton-addWatchListFromTag"></span></button></span></span></span>: This stock is a favorite of mine, said Cramer. I'm a buyer.<br/></p><p><span class="QuoteInBody-quoteNameContainer" data-test="QuoteInBody" id="NewsShowArticle-QuoteInBody-5"><a href="/quotes/CLMT/">Calumet Specialty Products (CLMT)</a><span class="QuoteInBody-inlineButton"><span class="AddToWatchlistButton-watchlistContainer" data-analytics-id="-WatchlistDropdown" id="-WatchlistDropdown"><button class="AddToWatchlistButton-watchlistButton"><span class="AddToWatchlistButton-addWatchListFromTag"></span></button></span></span></span>: I like this one, said Cramer. I'd pull the trigger.</p><p><a href="#">Allergan (AGN)</a>: I think it's a well run company but there are concerns that they may be vulnerable to generic competition, said Cramer. Let the dust settle. </p><div class="lazyload-placeholder" style="height:100%"></div><p><span class="QuoteInBody-quoteNameContainer" data-test="QuoteInBody" id="NewsShowArticle-QuoteInBody-7"><a href="/quotes/.MXXCP/">SanDisk (SNDK)</a><span class="QuoteInBody-inlineButton"><span class="AddToWatchlistButton-watchlistContainer" data-analytics-id="-WatchlistDropdown" id="-WatchlistDropdown"><button class="AddToWatchlistButton-watchlistButton"><span class="AddToWatchlistButton-addWatchListFromTag"></span></button></span></span></span>: It's old tech, said Cramer, but I think we're moving into a period when old tech works. </p><p>Call Cramer: 1-800-743-CNBC<br/> <br/> Questions for Cramer? madmoney@cnbc.com <br/> <br/> Questions, comments, suggestions for the "Mad Money" website? madcap@cnbc.com<br/></p></div><div class="MobileAdhesion-container" data-module="mps-slot" id="ArticleBody-MobileAdhesion"></div></div> watch nowVIDEO4:0304:03Lightning RoundMad Money with Jim Cramer Are you ready skeedaddy???!!! It's time for the Lightning Round. Cramer makes the call on viewer favorites.Lions Gate (LGF): This entertainment company has a great pipeline, said Cramer. I'm a buyer.Scorpio Tankers (STNG): I'm a fan of this entire group, said Cramer. username | Wikipedia Arena Pharmaceuticals (ARNA): It's not a buy for me, said Cramer. I think there are better places to make money.Becton, Dickinson & Co (BDX): This stock is a favorite of mine, said Cramer. I'm a buyer.Calumet Specialty Products (CLMT): I like this one, said Cramer. I'd pull the trigger.Allergan (AGN): I think it's a well run company but there are concerns that they may be vulnerable to generic competition, said Cramer. Let the dust settle. SanDisk (SNDK): It's old tech, said Cramer, but I think we're moving into a period when old tech works. Call Cramer: 1-800-743-CNBC Questions for Cramer? madmoney@cnbc.com Questions, comments, suggestions for the "Mad Money" website? madcap@cnbc.com 6d9d3587-d114-57d6-bbfa-3e8e44810235 02/08/23
Unintended shutdown furlough: The corporate CFO https://www.cnbc.com/2013/10/14/unintended-shutdown-furlough-the-corporate-cfo.html 2013-10-14T20:45:12+0000 Jeff Brown, Special to CNBC.com CNBC The government shutdown hasn't just furloughed the Statue of Liberty and Yogi Bear, but made corporate CFOs want to head for home. cnbc, Articles, Continental Airlines, Inc., Citigroup Inc, Twitter (delisted), Executive Edge, Investing, source:tagname:CNBC US Source https://image.cnbcfm.com/api/v1/image/101109989-184413018.jpg?v=1381758807 Investing <div class="ArticleBody-articleBody" data-analytics="SpecialReportArticle-articleBody-6-2" data-module="ArticleBody" data-test="articleBody-2" id="SpecialReportArticle-ArticleBody-6"><span class="HighlightShare-hidden" style="top:0;left:0"></span><div class="InlineImage-imageEmbed" data-test="InlineImage" id="ArticleBody-InlineImage-101109989"><div class="InlineImage-wrapper"><div class="InlineImage-imagePlaceholder" style="padding-bottom:55.55555555555556%"><div class="lazyload-placeholder" style="height:100%"></div></div><div><div class="InlineImage-imageEmbedCaption"></div><div class="InlineImage-imageEmbedCredit">Getty Images</div></div></div></div><div class="group"><p> <em>Recapping the day's news and newsmakers through the lens of CNBC.</em><br/></p><p> <em>Notes:</em></p><div class="lazyload-placeholder" style="height:100%"></div><p> The Statue of Liberty and Yogi bear weren't the only national figures left in limbo by the government shutdown. The corporate CFO may prefer to go home rather than try to set a 2014 budget at a time like this. The variety of ways in which the debt ceiling breach could be avoided, as well as the potential changes to the federal tax code to get a budget deal done, could make it difficult for CFOs to set a financial plan for the coming year with any conviction. That could mean instead of <a href="https://www.cnbc.com/2013/10/14/debt-dithering-taking-toll-in-corporate-america.html">making tough investment choices</a>, CFOs go on greenlighting stock buybacks as a way to spend cash on the balance sheet, as has been the case in recent years.</p><p> <em>Quote:</em></p><p> "You don't know what the next step is and you don't know if you are going to step on a bomb or it's going to set you free."—Gordon Bethune, former CEO of <span class="QuoteInBody-quoteNameContainer" data-test="QuoteInBody" id="SpecialReportArticle-QuoteInBody-2"><a href="/quotes/undefined/">Continental Airlines</a><span class="QuoteInBody-inlineButton"><span class="AddToWatchlistButton-watchlistContainer" data-analytics-id="-WatchlistDropdown" id="-WatchlistDropdown"><button class="AddToWatchlistButton-watchlistButton"><span class="AddToWatchlistButton-addWatchListFromTag"></span></button></span></span></span>. <br/></p></div><div class="InlineImage-imageEmbed" data-test="InlineImage" id="ArticleBody-InlineImage-101106921"><div class="InlineImage-wrapper"><div class="InlineImage-imagePlaceholder" style="padding-bottom:55.55555555555556%"><div class="lazyload-placeholder" style="height:100%"></div></div><div><div class="InlineImage-imageEmbedCaption">Trader on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.</div><div class="InlineImage-imageEmbedCredit">Getty Images</div></div></div></div><div class="group"><p><strong>Getting out of the US while the getting is still good</strong></p><p> <em>Notes:</em></p><div class="lazyload-placeholder" style="height:100%"></div><p> After riding a wave of gains in U.S. stocks, the pros are betting that some foreign issues will do better next year. In a quarterly poll, institutional investors told <span class="QuoteInBody-quoteNameContainer" data-test="QuoteInBody" id="SpecialReportArticle-QuoteInBody-3"><a href="/quotes/C/">Citigroup</a><span class="QuoteInBody-inlineButton"><span class="AddToWatchlistButton-watchlistContainer" data-analytics-id="-WatchlistDropdown" id="-WatchlistDropdown"><button class="AddToWatchlistButton-watchlistButton"><span class="AddToWatchlistButton-addWatchListFromTag"></span></button></span></span></span> that European stocks are now the <a href="https://www.cnbc.com/2013/10/14/big-money-turning-sights-outside-the-us-in-2014.html">hottest prospects</a>, followed by Asian stocks. American ones were third. That doesn't mean they were dissing the U.S. The average respondent said the S&amp;P 500 will gain at least 6 percent next year, and about a third said at least 9 percent. <br/></p><p> <em>Quote:</em></p><p> "This focus on Europe was fascinating in that this was the first time in the quarterly poll that such results were registered."—Tobias Levkovich, Citi's chief market strategist<br/></p></div><div class="InlineImage-imageEmbed" data-test="InlineImage" id="ArticleBody-InlineImage-100972711"><div class="InlineImage-wrapper"><div class="InlineImage-imagePlaceholder" style="padding-bottom:55.55555555555556%"><div class="lazyload-placeholder" style="height:100%"></div></div><div><div class="InlineImage-imageEmbedCaption">The Weebly headquarters has ping pong tables set up in its office for employees to use during their breaks.</div><div class="InlineImage-imageEmbedCredit">Source: Weebly</div></div></div></div><div class="group"><p> <strong>Hiring extras to play ping pong in Silicon Valley</strong></p><p> <em>Notes:</em></p><p> In Silicon Valley, where firms are desperate to hire A-list software engineers, the value of creativity in recruiting is leading to some unusual benefits, well beyond competitive salary and health insurance. Free cafeterias, laundry services and shuttle buses aren't nearly enough, either. One firm gave an engineer a free Tesla car that leased for $1,000 a month. Another made sure the office Ping-Pong table was actually in use while a recruit was on tour, and another firm provided a key engineer with a drum studio. The second-highest paid <span class="QuoteInBody-quoteNameContainer" data-test="QuoteInBody" id="SpecialReportArticle-QuoteInBody-5"><a href="/quotes/TWTR/">Twitter</a><span class="QuoteInBody-inlineButton"><span class="AddToWatchlistButton-watchlistContainer" data-analytics-id="-WatchlistDropdown" id="-WatchlistDropdown"><button class="AddToWatchlistButton-watchlistButton"><span class="AddToWatchlistButton-addWatchListFromTag"></span></button></span></span></span> executive behind CEO Dick Costelo is the company's senior v.p. of engineering, not any of its trio of other "chiefs"—operations, technology and finance.</p><p> <em>Quote</em>:</p><p> "Having 10x engineers at the top is the only way to recruit other 10x engineers."—Aileen Lee, founder of Cowboy Ventures, an early-stage venture fund, on the Silicon Valley lore of the "10x" engineer, who is a person so talented that he or she does the work of 10 merely competent engineers.<br/></p></div><div class="InlineImage-imageEmbed" data-test="InlineImage" id="ArticleBody-InlineImage-100626699"><div class="InlineImage-wrapper"><div class="InlineImage-imagePlaceholder" style="padding-bottom:55.55555555555556%"><div class="lazyload-placeholder" style="height:100%"></div></div><div><div class="InlineImage-imageEmbedCaption">Sir Richard Branson, Virgin Group, Founder and Chairman</div><div class="InlineImage-imageEmbedCredit">Adam Jeffery | CNBC </div></div></div></div><div class="group"><p><strong>Tax heaven</strong></p><p> <em>Notes</em>:</p><p> Dealing with bad press is one of those chores that any executive may face at some point. Billionaire entrepreneur Richard Branson's response to a story suggesting he'd moved from his native England to the Virgin Islands to save taxes looks like an example of <a href="https://www.cnbc.com/2013/10/14/richard-branson-denies-quitting-uk-for-tax-reasons.html">how to do it right</a>. To prevent the criticism from taking root, he responded almost instantly, in his own words, not a spokesman's, on his personal blog. And his defense had a ring of truth, pointing out he's now devoting his time to philanthropy.</p><p> <em>Quote</em>:</p><p> "I have not left Britain for tax reasons but for my love of the beautiful British Virgin Islands and in particular Necker Island, which I bought when I was 29 years old. ... I have been very fortunate to accumulate so much wealth in my career, more than I need in my lifetime, and would not live somewhere I don't want to for tax reasons."—Sir Richard Branson<br/></p></div><div class="InlineImage-imageEmbed" data-test="InlineImage" id="ArticleBody-InlineImage-100959760"><div class="InlineImage-wrapper"><div class="InlineImage-imagePlaceholder" style="padding-bottom:55.55555555555556%"><div class="lazyload-placeholder" style="height:100%"></div></div><div><div class="InlineImage-imageEmbedCaption">Expanded ticket lobby at the San Diego International Airport.</div><div class="InlineImage-imageEmbedCredit">Source: San Diego International Airport</div></div></div></div><div class="group"><p> <strong>Now boarding</strong></p><p> <em>Notes</em>:</p><p> If you've ever stood in the aisle waiting as another passenger s-l-o-w-l-y takes off a coat, fiddles around for a book and then attempts to cram an overstuffed bag into the overhead bin, you know how tedious the process can be. <span style="background-color:rgb(255, 255, 255);font-size:14px">Good news: there is no shortage of ideas on how change the boarding process. A solar-powered boarding ramp made by Keith Consolidated Industries of Medford, Ore., is being tested on some planes at big city airports. </span><span style="background-color:rgb(255, 255, 255);font-size:14px">Another option is seats that slide out of the way to let passengers in more quickly. </span><span>There's even a physicist who h</span><span style="background-color:rgb(255, 255, 255);font-size:14px">as developed a model to board passengers in a line so that when they enter the airplane their seats are spaced two rows apart. </span></p><p><em>Quote</em><span style="background-color:rgb(255, 255, 255);font-size:14px">:</span><br/></p><p> "For example, the first passengers would be 30A, 28A, 26A, 24A, 22A, etc. If speed is the primary goal, I believe that this method is the fastest."—Jason Steffen, a Lindheimer Fellow in the physics department at Northwestern University<br/></p><p> —<em>By Jeff Brown, Special to CNBC.com</em></p></div><div class="MobileAdhesion-container" data-module="mps-slot" id="ArticleBody-MobileAdhesion"></div></div> Getty Images Recapping the day's news and newsmakers through the lens of CNBC. Notes: The Statue of Liberty and Yogi bear weren't the only national figures left in limbo by the government shutdown. The corporate CFO may prefer to go home rather than try to set a 2014 budget at a time like this. The variety of ways in which the debt ceiling breach could be avoided, as well as the potential changes to the federal tax code to get a budget deal done, could make it difficult for CFOs to set a financial plan for the coming year with any conviction. That could mean instead of making tough investment choices, CFOs go on greenlighting stock buybacks as a way to spend cash on the balance sheet, as has been the case in recent years. Quote: "You don't know what the next step is and you don't know if you are going to step on a bomb or it's going to set you free."—Gordon Bethune, former CEO of Continental Airlines. Trader on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.Getty ImagesGetting out of the US while the getting is still good Notes: After riding a wave of gains in U.S. stocks, the pros are betting that some foreign issues will do better next year. In a quarterly poll, institutional investors told Citigroup that European stocks are now the hottest prospects, followed by Asian stocks. American ones were third. That doesn't mean they were dissing the U.S. The average respondent said the S&P 500 will gain at least 6 percent next year, and about a third said at least 9 percent. Quote: "This focus on Europe was fascinating in that this was the first time in the quarterly poll that such results were registered."—Tobias Levkovich, Citi's chief market strategistThe Weebly headquarters has ping pong tables set up in its office for employees to use during their breaks.Source: Weebly Hiring extras to play ping pong in Silicon Valley Notes: In Silicon Valley, where firms are desperate to hire A-list software engineers, the value of creativity in recruiting is leading to some unusual benefits, well beyond competitive salary and health insurance. Free cafeterias, laundry services and shuttle buses aren't nearly enough, either. One firm gave an engineer a free Tesla car that leased for $1,000 a month. Another made sure the office Ping-Pong table was actually in use while a recruit was on tour, and another firm provided a key engineer with a drum studio. The second-highest paid Twitter executive behind CEO Dick Costelo is the company's senior v.p. of engineering, not any of its trio of other "chiefs"—operations, technology and finance. Quote: "Having 10x engineers at the top is the only way to recruit other 10x engineers."—Aileen Lee, founder of Cowboy Ventures, an early-stage venture fund, on the Silicon Valley lore of the "10x" engineer, who is a person so talented that he or she does the work of 10 merely competent engineers.Sir Richard Branson, Virgin Group, Founder and ChairmanAdam Jeffery | CNBC Tax heaven Notes: Dealing with bad press is one of those chores that any executive may face at some point. Billionaire entrepreneur Richard Branson's response to a story suggesting he'd moved from his native England to the Virgin Islands to save taxes looks like an example of how to do it right. To prevent the criticism from taking root, he responded almost instantly, in his own words, not a spokesman's, on his personal blog. And his defense had a ring of truth, pointing out he's now devoting his time to philanthropy. Quote: "I have not left Britain for tax reasons but for my love of the beautiful British Virgin Islands and in particular Necker Island, which I bought when I was 29 years old. ... I have been very fortunate to accumulate so much wealth in my career, more than I need in my lifetime, and would not live somewhere I don't want to for tax reasons."—Sir Richard BransonExpanded ticket lobby at the San Diego International Airport.Source: San Diego International Airport Now boarding Notes: If you've ever stood in the aisle waiting as another passenger s-l-o-w-l-y takes off a coat, fiddles around for a book and then attempts to cram an overstuffed bag into the overhead bin, you know how tedious the process can be. Good news: there is no shortage of ideas on how change the boarding process. A solar-powered boarding ramp made by Keith Consolidated Industries of Medford, Ore., is being tested on some planes at big city airports. Another option is seats that slide out of the way to let passengers in more quickly. There's even a physicist who has developed a model to board passengers in a line so that when they enter the airplane their seats are spaced two rows apart. Quote: "For example, the first passengers would be 30A, 28A, 26A, 24A, 22A, etc. If speed is the primary goal, I believe that this method is the fastest."—Jason Steffen, a Lindheimer Fellow in the physics department at Northwestern University —By Jeff Brown, Special to CNBC.com f312a365-e7e9-5a58-9c75-f58673ca20ec 02/08/23
'Field of Dreams' baseball game was a ratings win for Fox with 5.9 million viewers https://www.cnbc.com/2021/08/13/field-of-dreams-mlb-baseball-game-draws-5point9-million-viewers-for-fox.html 2021-08-13T22:25:01+0000 Jabari Young CNBC The Chicago White Sox beat the New York Yankees, 9-8, in a Hollywood-like ending in MLB's Field of Dreams game. cnbc, Articles, Technology, Business, Life, Sports, Chicago, New York, Media, Iowa, Major League Baseball, source:tagname:CNBC US Source https://image.cnbcfm.com/api/v1/image/106926807-1628866967515-gettyimages-1333866425-775670234rv_wsox_yankees_046.jpeg?v=1628867013 Technology <div class="ArticleBody-articleBody" data-analytics="RegularArticle-articleBody-5-2" data-module="ArticleBody" data-test="articleBody-2" id="RegularArticle-ArticleBody-5"><span class="HighlightShare-hidden" style="top:0;left:0"></span><div class="InlineImage-imageEmbed" data-test="InlineImage" id="ArticleBody-InlineImage-106926807"><div class="InlineImage-wrapper"><div class="InlineImage-imagePlaceholder" style="padding-bottom:55.55555555555556%"><div class="lazyload-placeholder" style="height:100%"></div></div><div><div class="InlineImage-imageEmbedCaption">Members of the Chicago White Sox celebrate at home plate after Tim Anderson #7 of the Chicago White Sox hit a game winning, walk-off home run in the ninth inning against the New York Yankees on August 12, 2021 at Field of Dreams in Dyersville, Iowa.</div><div class="InlineImage-imageEmbedCredit">Ron Vesely | Getty Images Sport | Getty Images</div></div></div></div><div class="group"><p>Major League Baseball's Field of Dreams game was a dream come true for Fox Sports.</p><p>The network announced MLB's movie-themed contest between the New York Yankees and Chicago White Sox attracted an average of 5.9 million viewers across TV and streaming, and was most-viewed MLB regular-season game on the network since 2005. In that season, the Yankees-Boston Red Sox contest on Oct. 1 also drew roughly 5.9 million viewers.</p><div class="lazyload-placeholder" style="height:100%"></div><p>The game was played in Dyersville, Iowa, in a ballpark built next to a cornfield, echoing the scene from the 1989 Universal Pictures film starring Kevin Costner. Costner entered from the cornfield in a cinematic fashion, followed by Yankees and White Sox players, who wore throwback uniforms.</p><p>The White Sox beat the Yankees, 9-8, in a Hollywood-like ending. Thursday's game concluded with a home run in the ninth inning by White Sox shortstop Tim Anderson. That two-run score came after Yankees hitters Aaron Judge and Giancarlo Stanton recorded their two-run homers in the top of the ninth after trailing 7-4. Stanton's hit gave the Yankees an 8-7 lead until Anderson saved the White Sox's dream from turning into a nightmare.</p><p>Fox Sports said the game peaked at roughly 6 million viewers between 8:45 to 9:00 p.m. Eastern time, and top markets that watched the game outside of Chicago and New York included St. Louis, Kansas City, and Hartford, Conn.</p></div><div aria-labelledby="Placeholder-ArticleBody-Video-106925781" role="region"><div class="PlaceHolder-wrapper" data-test="VideoPlaceHolder" data-vilynx-id="7000204487" id="Placeholder-ArticleBody-Video-106925781" role="button" tabindex="0"><div class="InlineVideo-videoEmbed" data-test="InlineVideo" id="InlineVideo-0"><div class="InlineVideo-wrapper"><div class="InlineVideo-inlineThumbnailContainer"><img alt="'Field of Dreams' game takes place tomorrow night in Iowa" class="InlineVideo-videoThumbnail" src="https://image.cnbcfm.com/api/v1/image/106925782-16287261351628726133-17994451710-1080pnbcnews.jpg?v=1628726135&amp;w=750&amp;h=422&amp;vtcrop=y"/><span class="InlineVideo-videoButton"></span><span><div class="undefined PlayButton-container" data-test="PlayButton"><div class="PlayButton-featured PlayButton-base" data-type="play"><span class="PlayButton-flyout">watch now</span><span class="icon-play-triangle PlayButton-icon"></span></div></div></span></div><div class="InlineVideo-videoFooter"><div class="InlineVideo-videoDurationContainer"><span class="InlineVideo-videoLabel">VIDEO</span><span class="InlineVideo-videoDurationWithLeading0">1:25</span><span class="InlineVideo-videoDuration InlineVideo-videoLabel">01:25</span></div><div class="InlineVideo-title">'Field of Dreams' game takes place tomorrow night in Iowa</div><div class="InlineVideo-section"><a href="https://www.cnbc.com/the-news-with-shepard-smith/">The News with Shepard Smith</a></div></div></div></div><div class="PlaceHolder-endCard PlaceHolder-inactive"></div></div></div><div class="group"><p>On the advertising side, a <a href="https://www.sportsbusinessjournal.com/SB-Blogs/Newsletter-Media/2021/08/09.aspx" target="_blank">Fox Sports executive</a> estimated the network would accumulate a record-high in sales from any other MLB regular-season game aired on the network, according to Sports Business Journal. The executive didn't disclose a figure, though.</p><p>Kevin Krim, the founder and CEO of advertising metrics data firm EDO, said brands drew NFL-like impressions around searches. EDO uses analytics that track brand and product searches and sales when ads air, helping companies and networks determine an ads' value during sporting events.</p><div class="lazyload-placeholder" style="height:100%"></div><p>The company has clients including Fox Sports, ESPN, and CNBC parent company, NBCUniversal.</p><p>Krim said one of the top ads included Hyundai's 30-second spot, which drew 35,000 incremental searches in the minutes following its Field of Dreams game airing. "That would be a really good number for an NFL game on prime time," Krim told CNBC, adding Thursday night NFL games draw an average 43,000 searches around automobile ads.</p><p>Krim said a segment of marketers who want to be "innovative" are drawn to customized sporting events like MLB's Field of Dreams game and the National Hockey League's Winter Classic. "And it certainly helps the networks have a new thing to sell," he added. "It takes a slow time of year, and it gives you something to sell."</p><p>It also helped that two competitive teams were playing. The Yankees are still in playoff contention, only seven games removed from first place, and the White Sox have a comfortable 11.5-game lead atop the AL Central. Also, MLB has little competition from other sports now -- it only had to compete with NBA's Summer League games and NFL preseason contests.</p><p>The Field of Dreams game was originally going to feature a White Sox-Cardinals contest during 2020 season, but got postponed due to the pandemic.</p></div><div class="InlineImage-imageEmbed" data-test="InlineImage" id="ArticleBody-InlineImage-106926806"><div class="InlineImage-wrapper"><div class="InlineImage-imagePlaceholder" style="padding-bottom:55.55555555555556%"><div class="lazyload-placeholder" style="height:100%"></div></div><div><div class="InlineImage-imageEmbedCaption">Players from the Chicago White Sox and New York Yankees walk though the corn rows while being introduced prior to the game on August 12, 2021 at Field of Dreams in Dyersville, Iowa.</div><div class="InlineImage-imageEmbedCredit">Ron Vesely | Getty Images Sport | Getty Images</div></div></div></div><div class="group"><p>"It's the type of presentation that MLB should do all the time," said former Oakland Athletics executive vice president Andy Dolich. "It shows the storytelling capabilities of baseball. Anytime you can present an event and get people's focus from all levels, which that did, you should look to annualize it but not overdo it."</p><p>Official attendance was 7,832, with some premium tickets <a href="https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/field-of-dreams-stadium-iowa/index.html" target="_blank">selling for $10,000</a>. With the hype and engagement around this year's contest, MLB commissioner Rob Manfred said another Field of Dreams game is scheduled for the 2022 season -- should MLB avoid a work stoppage.</p><p>"I think the reception that this event has received has been so positive that we will be back," Manfred said <a href="https://www.mlb.com/news/commissioner-rob-manfred-on-field-of-dreams-game" target="_blank">via MLB.com</a>. "I think it's pretty clear we're going to be back next year, and we'll have to talk about it after that. But it's just been so successful that it's hard not to take the opportunity to do it again."</p></div><div aria-labelledby="Placeholder-ArticleBody-Video-106923825" role="region"><div class="PlaceHolder-wrapper" data-test="VideoPlaceHolder" data-vilynx-id="7000203923" id="Placeholder-ArticleBody-Video-106923825" role="button" tabindex="0"><div class="InlineVideo-videoEmbed" data-test="InlineVideo" id="InlineVideo-0"><div class="InlineVideo-wrapper"><div class="InlineVideo-inlineThumbnailContainer"><img alt="How the Olympic Games performed amid the changing media landscape" class="InlineVideo-videoThumbnail" src="https://image.cnbcfm.com/api/v1/image/106923826-16285068061628506802-17943073769-1080pnbcnews.jpg?v=1628506805&amp;w=750&amp;h=422&amp;vtcrop=y"/><span class="InlineVideo-videoButton"></span><span><div class="undefined PlayButton-container" data-test="PlayButton"><div class="PlayButton-featured PlayButton-base" data-type="play"><span class="PlayButton-flyout">watch now</span><span class="icon-play-triangle PlayButton-icon"></span></div></div></span></div><div class="InlineVideo-videoFooter"><div class="InlineVideo-videoDurationContainer"><span class="InlineVideo-videoLabel">VIDEO</span><span class="InlineVideo-videoDurationWithLeading0">5:47</span><span class="InlineVideo-videoDuration InlineVideo-videoLabel">05:47</span></div><div class="InlineVideo-title">How the Olympic Games performed amid the changing media landscape</div><div class="InlineVideo-section"><a href="https://www.cnbc.com/squawk-box-us/">Squawk Box</a></div></div></div></div><div class="PlaceHolder-endCard PlaceHolder-inactive"></div></div></div><div class="MobileAdhesion-container" data-module="mps-slot" id="ArticleBody-MobileAdhesion"></div></div> Members of the Chicago White Sox celebrate at home plate after Tim Anderson #7 of the Chicago White Sox hit a game winning, walk-off home run in the ninth inning against the New York Yankees on August 12, 2021 at Field of Dreams in Dyersville, Iowa.Ron Vesely | Getty Images Sport | Getty ImagesMajor League Baseball's Field of Dreams game was a dream come true for Fox Sports.The network announced MLB's movie-themed contest between the New York Yankees and Chicago White Sox attracted an average of 5.9 million viewers across TV and streaming, and was most-viewed MLB regular-season game on the network since 2005. In that season, the Yankees-Boston Red Sox contest on Oct. 1 also drew roughly 5.9 million viewers.The game was played in Dyersville, Iowa, in a ballpark built next to a cornfield, echoing the scene from the 1989 Universal Pictures film starring Kevin Costner. Costner entered from the cornfield in a cinematic fashion, followed by Yankees and White Sox players, who wore throwback uniforms.The White Sox beat the Yankees, 9-8, in a Hollywood-like ending. Thursday's game concluded with a home run in the ninth inning by White Sox shortstop Tim Anderson. That two-run score came after Yankees hitters Aaron Judge and Giancarlo Stanton recorded their two-run homers in the top of the ninth after trailing 7-4. Stanton's hit gave the Yankees an 8-7 lead until Anderson saved the White Sox's dream from turning into a nightmare.Fox Sports said the game peaked at roughly 6 million viewers between 8:45 to 9:00 p.m. Eastern time, and top markets that watched the game outside of Chicago and New York included St. Louis, Kansas City, and Hartford, Conn.watch nowVIDEO1:2501:25'Field of Dreams' game takes place tomorrow night in IowaThe News with Shepard SmithOn the advertising side, a Fox Sports executive estimated the network would accumulate a record-high in sales from any other MLB regular-season game aired on the network, according to Sports Business Journal. The executive didn't disclose a figure, though.Kevin Krim, the founder and CEO of advertising metrics data firm EDO, said brands drew NFL-like impressions around searches. EDO uses analytics that track brand and product searches and sales when ads air, helping companies and networks determine an ads' value during sporting events.The company has clients including Fox Sports, ESPN, and CNBC parent company, NBCUniversal.Krim said one of the top ads included Hyundai's 30-second spot, which drew 35,000 incremental searches in the minutes following its Field of Dreams game airing. "That would be a really good number for an NFL game on prime time," Krim told CNBC, adding Thursday night NFL games draw an average 43,000 searches around automobile ads.Krim said a segment of marketers who want to be "innovative" are drawn to customized sporting events like MLB's Field of Dreams game and the National Hockey League's Winter Classic. "And it certainly helps the networks have a new thing to sell," he added. "It takes a slow time of year, and it gives you something to sell."It also helped that two competitive teams were playing. The Yankees are still in playoff contention, only seven games removed from first place, and the White Sox have a comfortable 11.5-game lead atop the AL Central. Also, MLB has little competition from other sports now -- it only had to compete with NBA's Summer League games and NFL preseason contests.The Field of Dreams game was originally going to feature a White Sox-Cardinals contest during 2020 season, but got postponed due to the pandemic.Players from the Chicago White Sox and New York Yankees walk though the corn rows while being introduced prior to the game on August 12, 2021 at Field of Dreams in Dyersville, Iowa.Ron Vesely | Getty Images Sport | Getty Images"It's the type of presentation that MLB should do all the time," said former Oakland Athletics executive vice president Andy Dolich. "It shows the storytelling capabilities of baseball. Anytime you can present an event and get people's focus from all levels, which that did, you should look to annualize it but not overdo it."Official attendance was 7,832, with some premium tickets selling for $10,000. With the hype and engagement around this year's contest, MLB commissioner Rob Manfred said another Field of Dreams game is scheduled for the 2022 season -- should MLB avoid a work stoppage."I think the reception that this event has received has been so positive that we will be back," Manfred said via MLB.com. "I think it's pretty clear we're going to be back next year, and we'll have to talk about it after that. But it's just been so successful that it's hard not to take the opportunity to do it again."watch nowVIDEO5:4705:47How the Olympic Games performed amid the changing media landscapeSquawk Box b89ffdd1-70e8-51a2-bd57-4a47d87a1a83 02/08/23
Mortgage demand falls as interest rates surge to multiyear highs https://www.cnbc.com/2022/03/16/mortgage-demand-falls-as-interest-rates-surge-to-multiyear-highs.html 2022-03-16T11:00:02+0000 Diana Olick CNBC A sharp jump in mortgage rates last week soured demand from both current homeowners and potential homebuyers, causing mortgage applications to drop. cnbc, Articles, Housing, Real estate, Mortgages, Real Estate, US: News, Foreclosures, Business News, source:tagname:CNBC US Source https://image.cnbcfm.com/api/v1/image/106872307-1619099233443-gettyimages-1310155848-dscf6950_2021033133456639.jpeg?v=1647384812 Business News <div class="ArticleBody-articleBody" data-analytics="RegularArticle-articleBody-5-2" data-module="ArticleBody" data-test="articleBody-2" id="RegularArticle-ArticleBody-5"><span class="HighlightShare-hidden" style="top:0;left:0"></span><div class="InlineImage-imageEmbed" data-test="InlineImage" id="ArticleBody-InlineImage-106872307"><div class="InlineImage-wrapper"><div class="InlineImage-imagePlaceholder" style="padding-bottom:55.55555555555556%"><div class="lazyload-placeholder" style="height:100%"></div></div><div><div class="InlineImage-imageEmbedCaption">A home stands for sale in a Brooklyn neighborhood on New York City.</div><div class="InlineImage-imageEmbedCredit">Spencer Platt | Getty Images</div></div></div></div><div class="group"><p>A sharp jump in mortgage rates last week soured demand from both current homeowners and potential homebuyers, causing mortgage applications to drop. With rates now back on the expected upward trajectory, following a brief drop at the start of the <a href="https://www.cnbc.com/2022/03/16/russia-ukraine-live-updates.html">Russian invasion of Ukraine</a>, mortgage volume is likely to fall further in the coming weeks.</p><p>The average contract interest rate for 30-year fixed-rate mortgages with conforming loan balances ($647,200 or less) increased to 4.27% from 4.09%, with points rising to 0.54 from 0.44 (including the origination fee) for loans with a 20% down payment, according to the Mortgage Bankers Association.</p><div class="lazyload-placeholder" style="height:100%"></div><p>"Mortgage rates continue to be volatile due to the significant uncertainty regarding Federal Reserve policy and the situation in Ukraine. Investors are weighing the impacts of rapidly increasing inflation in the U.S. and many other parts of the world against the potential for a slowdown in economic growth due to a renewed bout of supply-chain constraints," said Joel Kan, an MBA economist.</p><p>Applications to refinance a home loan, which are most sensitive to weekly rate moves, fell 3% for the week, seasonally adjusted, and were 49% lower than the same week one year ago, when rates were a full percentage point lower. The refinance share of mortgage activity decreased to 48.4% of total applications from 49.5% the previous week. Fewer and fewer borrowers can now benefit from a refinance, and while borrowers now have considerably more equity in their homes than before the <a href="https://www.cnbc.com/coronavirus/">Covid pandemic</a>, most will take it out in a second loan, rather than refinance to a higher rate.</p></div><div aria-labelledby="Placeholder-ArticleBody-Video-107029452" role="region"><div class="PlaceHolder-wrapper" data-test="VideoPlaceHolder" data-vilynx-id="7000237352" id="Placeholder-ArticleBody-Video-107029452" role="button" tabindex="0"><div class="InlineVideo-videoEmbed" data-test="InlineVideo" id="InlineVideo-0"><div class="InlineVideo-wrapper"><div class="InlineVideo-inlineThumbnailContainer"><img alt="Mortgage rates on the rise again" class="InlineVideo-videoThumbnail" src="https://image.cnbcfm.com/api/v1/image/107029453-16470426361647042634-21947784081-1080pnbcnews.jpg?v=1647042636&amp;w=750&amp;h=422&amp;vtcrop=y"/><span class="InlineVideo-videoButton"></span><span><div class="undefined PlayButton-container" data-test="PlayButton"><div class="PlayButton-featured PlayButton-base" data-type="play"><span class="PlayButton-flyout">watch now</span><span class="icon-play-triangle PlayButton-icon"></span></div></div></span></div><div class="InlineVideo-videoFooter"><div class="InlineVideo-videoDurationContainer"><span class="InlineVideo-videoLabel">VIDEO</span><span class="InlineVideo-videoDurationWithLeading0">2:40</span><span class="InlineVideo-videoDuration InlineVideo-videoLabel">02:40</span></div><div class="InlineVideo-title">Mortgage rates on the rise again</div><div class="InlineVideo-section"><a href="https://www.cnbc.com/fastmoney/">Fast Money</a></div></div></div></div><div class="PlaceHolder-endCard PlaceHolder-inactive"></div></div></div><div class="group"><p>Mortgage applications to purchase a home rose just 1% for the week and were 8% lower than the same week one year ago. Homebuyers today are facing an increasingly expensive market, as prices are still gaining at a record pace from a year ago. Supply is starting to increase slightly, but there are still not nearly enough homes on the market to meet demand and cool competition.</p><p>Home prices are so high that the average loan size in applications last week to buy a home was $453,200 – the second-highest amount in the MBA's survey.</p><p>Mortgage rates moved significantly higher at the start of this week, as investors anticipate an interest rate hike Wednesday by the Federal Reserve. While mortgage rates don't follow the fed funds rate, they do loosely follow the yield on the 10-year Treasury and are also heavily influenced by the Fed's plan to taper its purchases of mortgage-backed bonds and reduce its holdings.</p><p>"Any time yields are pushing multi-year highs, it's at least worth having a discussion about potential shifts in the trend based solely on momentum," wrote Matthew Graham, chief operating officer of Mortgage News Daily. "It's not oversimplifying things to say that rallies can happen simply due to an overabundance of selling pressure."  </p></div><div class="MobileAdhesion-container" data-module="mps-slot" id="ArticleBody-MobileAdhesion"></div></div> A home stands for sale in a Brooklyn neighborhood on New York City.Spencer Platt | Getty ImagesA sharp jump in mortgage rates last week soured demand from both current homeowners and potential homebuyers, causing mortgage applications to drop. With rates now back on the expected upward trajectory, following a brief drop at the start of the Russian invasion of Ukraine, mortgage volume is likely to fall further in the coming weeks.The average contract interest rate for 30-year fixed-rate mortgages with conforming loan balances ($647,200 or less) increased to 4.27% from 4.09%, with points rising to 0.54 from 0.44 (including the origination fee) for loans with a 20% down payment, according to the Mortgage Bankers Association."Mortgage rates continue to be volatile due to the significant uncertainty regarding Federal Reserve policy and the situation in Ukraine. Investors are weighing the impacts of rapidly increasing inflation in the U.S. and many other parts of the world against the potential for a slowdown in economic growth due to a renewed bout of supply-chain constraints," said Joel Kan, an MBA economist.Applications to refinance a home loan, which are most sensitive to weekly rate moves, fell 3% for the week, seasonally adjusted, and were 49% lower than the same week one year ago, when rates were a full percentage point lower. The refinance share of mortgage activity decreased to 48.4% of total applications from 49.5% the previous week. Fewer and fewer borrowers can now benefit from a refinance, and while borrowers now have considerably more equity in their homes than before the Covid pandemic, most will take it out in a second loan, rather than refinance to a higher rate.watch nowVIDEO2:4002:40Mortgage rates on the rise againFast MoneyMortgage applications to purchase a home rose just 1% for the week and were 8% lower than the same week one year ago. Homebuyers today are facing an increasingly expensive market, as prices are still gaining at a record pace from a year ago. Supply is starting to increase slightly, but there are still not nearly enough homes on the market to meet demand and cool competition.Home prices are so high that the average loan size in applications last week to buy a home was $453,200 – the second-highest amount in the MBA's survey.Mortgage rates moved significantly higher at the start of this week, as investors anticipate an interest rate hike Wednesday by the Federal Reserve. While mortgage rates don't follow the fed funds rate, they do loosely follow the yield on the 10-year Treasury and are also heavily influenced by the Fed's plan to taper its purchases of mortgage-backed bonds and reduce its holdings."Any time yields are pushing multi-year highs, it's at least worth having a discussion about potential shifts in the trend based solely on momentum," wrote Matthew Graham, chief operating officer of Mortgage News Daily. "It's not oversimplifying things to say that rallies can happen simply due to an overabundance of selling pressure."   3dd874be-d018-5144-bb76-0f10af775115 02/08/23
US dollar index erases gains, turns flat after FOMC meeting minutes https://www.cnbc.com/2017/02/21/dollar-edges-down-as-market-awaits-fed-minutes.html 2017-02-22T19:54:37+0000 CNBC The dollar index erased earlier gains after Fed meeting minutes showed the next interest rate increase could be soon. cnbc, Articles, Federal Reserve System, USD/JPY, Currency markets, U.S. dollar, U.S. Dollar, The Fed, Currencies, Chinese Yuan, Euro, Markets, source:tagname:Reuters https://image.cnbcfm.com/api/v1/image/104174483-GettyImages-454138056.jpg?v=1529473645 Markets <div class="ArticleBody-articleBody" data-analytics="RegularArticle-articleBody-5-2" data-module="ArticleBody" data-test="articleBody-2" id="RegularArticle-ArticleBody-5"><span class="HighlightShare-hidden" style="top:0;left:0"></span><div class="InlineImage-imageEmbed" data-test="InlineImage" id="ArticleBody-InlineImage-104174483"><div class="InlineImage-wrapper"><div class="InlineImage-imagePlaceholder" style="padding-bottom:55.55555555555556%"><div class="lazyload-placeholder" style="height:100%"></div></div><div><div class="InlineImage-imageEmbedCaption"></div><div class="InlineImage-imageEmbedCredit">Philippe Huguen | AFP | Getty Images</div></div></div></div><div class="group"><p>The U.S. dollar index erased earlier gains on Wednesday after documents from the Federal Reserve showed the next interest rate increase could be soon.</p><p>On Wednesday, minutes from the Fed's last policy meeting showed policymakers thought it may be appropriate to raise interest rates again "fairly soon" should jobs and inflation data come in line with expectations.<br/></p><div class="lazyload-placeholder" style="height:100%"></div><p>The minutes of the Jan. 31-Feb. 1 discussion, at which the U.S. central bank voted to keep rates unchanged, also showed the depth of uncertainty at the Fed over the lack of clarity on the new Trump administration's economic program.<br/></p><p>The dollar index fell flat immediately after the announcement, down 0.1 percent on the day. The U.S. dollar fell 0.5 percent at 113.05 yen, while euro was up nearly 0.3 percent at $1.0562.</p><p>Earlier in the day, the <!-- --> recovered from its weakest level against the dollar in six weeks after far-right French presidential candidate Marine Le Pen's perceived chances of winning fell, reducing concerns given the candidate's anti-EU stance.<br/></p><p>Veteran French centrist Francois Bayrou said Wednesday he was offering an alliance with independent candidate Emmanuel Macron, a move that could give the former investment banker a much-needed boost to reach the runoff in May's presidential election.<br/> <br/>"Without a doubt, political uncertainty has been one of the greatest risks for the euro," said Kathy Lien, managing director at BK Asset Management in New York.<br/> <br/>Demand for the safe-haven yen fell following Bayrou's statement, reducing the dollar's losses against the Japanese currency. The dollar was essentially flat at 113.58 yen after slipping as much as 0.7 percent to a session low of 112.91 yen in morning U.S. trading.</p><p>So far, concern that Le Pen could win and deliver a fatal blow to the euro project have played out chiefly on the currency options market, where investors pay less to bet on the currency falling.<br/> <br/>Implied volatility for the next three months, which allows investors to protect themselves from swings in the currency - or bet on such volatility - rose to the highest since mid-December.</p><p><em>—CNBC's Berkeley Lovelace Jr. and Jeff Cox contributed to this report.</em></p></div><div class="MobileAdhesion-container" data-module="mps-slot" id="ArticleBody-MobileAdhesion"></div></div> Philippe Huguen | AFP | Getty ImagesThe U.S. dollar index erased earlier gains on Wednesday after documents from the Federal Reserve showed the next interest rate increase could be soon.On Wednesday, minutes from the Fed's last policy meeting showed policymakers thought it may be appropriate to raise interest rates again "fairly soon" should jobs and inflation data come in line with expectations.The minutes of the Jan. 31-Feb. 1 discussion, at which the U.S. central bank voted to keep rates unchanged, also showed the depth of uncertainty at the Fed over the lack of clarity on the new Trump administration's economic program.The dollar index fell flat immediately after the announcement, down 0.1 percent on the day. The U.S. dollar fell 0.5 percent at 113.05 yen, while euro was up nearly 0.3 percent at $1.0562.Earlier in the day, the recovered from its weakest level against the dollar in six weeks after far-right French presidential candidate Marine Le Pen's perceived chances of winning fell, reducing concerns given the candidate's anti-EU stance.Veteran French centrist Francois Bayrou said Wednesday he was offering an alliance with independent candidate Emmanuel Macron, a move that could give the former investment banker a much-needed boost to reach the runoff in May's presidential election. "Without a doubt, political uncertainty has been one of the greatest risks for the euro," said Kathy Lien, managing director at BK Asset Management in New York. Demand for the safe-haven yen fell following Bayrou's statement, reducing the dollar's losses against the Japanese currency. The dollar was essentially flat at 113.58 yen after slipping as much as 0.7 percent to a session low of 112.91 yen in morning U.S. trading.So far, concern that Le Pen could win and deliver a fatal blow to the euro project have played out chiefly on the currency options market, where investors pay less to bet on the currency falling. Implied volatility for the next three months, which allows investors to protect themselves from swings in the currency - or bet on such volatility - rose to the highest since mid-December.—CNBC's Berkeley Lovelace Jr. and Jeff Cox contributed to this report. 42e56a88-c715-5479-a45d-75586a3f0cff 02/08/23